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Port Elizabeth Museum Herpetology Type Specimens

Type specimens in the Port Elizabeth Museum, South Africa, including the historically important Albany Museum collection.

 

Adapted from (please cite the orginal papers if any of the information on this page is used in publications:

Conradie W, Branch WR, Watson G. 2019. Type specimens in the Port Elizabeth Museum, South Africa, including the historically important Albany Museum collection. Part 2: Reptiles (Squamata). Zootaxa 4576 (1): 001 045. https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4576.1.1

Conradie, W, Branch, W. R. & Watson, G. 2015. Type specimens in the Port Elizabeth Museum, South Africa, including the historical important AlbanyMuseum collection. Part 1: Amphibians. Zootaxa 3936 (1):042-070 https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.3936.1.2 

 

LIST OF TYPE SPECIMENS

 

REPTILIA

SQUAMATA

SAURIA

 

AMPHISBAENIDAE

Zygaspis ferox Broadley & Broadley, 1997

Syntarsus, 4:18 Fig. 1.

Paratype: PEM R10369 (formerly AMG 7764); Chirinda Forest, Zimbabwe; collector and date unknown.

             

Zygaspis vandami arenicola Broadley & Broadley, 1997

Syntarsus, 4:19; Fig. 12.

Paratype: PEM R10382 (formerly TMP 3001 and re-catalogued as AM 2626); Lourenço Marques [= Maputo], Mozambique; collector unknown, 4 December 1915.

Remarks. No documentation could be found discussing the transfer of material between the TMP to the AMG and must have been destroyed in the fire. The specimen is bleached but otherwise in good condition

 

AGAMIDAE

Agama lionotus var. mwanzane Loveridge, 1923

Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London, 1923:945.

Current name: Agama mwanzane Loveridge, 1923

Paratype: PEM R2310 (formerly MCZ R18582); Shanwa, Mwanza, Tanzania; A. Loveridge, 20 October 1922

Remarks. The description indicates that 41 specimens were collected and presented to the British Museum (now The Natural History Museum, London). No mention is made to the exchange of any types to other museums. The online MCZ database indicates that T. Barbour donated a series of specimens labelled as paratypes to MCZ. One of these was donated by Loveridge to Hewitt at the AMG.

 

CHAMAELEONIDAE

Bradypodion atromontanum Branch, Tolley & Tilbury, 2006

African Journal of Herpetology, 55(2):132; Fig. 2.

Holotype: PEM R5744; 500 m along road to Die Hell, west from Swartberg Pass (33°20’50”S, 22°01’40”E; 3322AC), Great Swartberg, Prince Alfred District, Western Cape Province, South Africa; C.R. Tilbury, 21 March 2002.

Paratypes (10): a) PEM R8858 (female allotype); 10 km along road to Die Hell, west from Swartberg Pass (33°21’50”S, 21°48’30”E; 3321BD), Great Swartberg, Prince Alfred District, Western Cape Province, South Africa; W.R. Branch, 10 December 1991. b) PEM R3672; Swartberg Pass (33°22’00”S, 22°06’00”E; 3322AC); G.J. Breytenbach, 4 January 1982. c) PEM R3680; Swartberg (33°22’10”S, 22°05’10”E; 3322AC), G.J. Breytenbach, 1 October 1981. d) PEM R5943; Swartberg Pass at turn-off to Die Hell (33°21’S, 22°02’E; 3322AC); C.R. Tilbury, April 1993. e) PEM R8856; 2.5 km along road to Die Hell, west of Swartberg Pass (33°21’S, 22°03’E; 3322AC); C.R. Tilbury, 9 March 1993. f) PEM R9153; Swartberg Pass (3321BD); C.R. Tilbury, 15 April 1994. g) PEM R5942; Swartberg Pass forestry house, 300 m S of turn-off to Die Hell (33°21’30”S, 22°02’03”E; 3322AC); G.J. Breytenbach, 1 January 1985. h) PEM R8844; 3–4 km along Botha’s Hoek road, track along crest of range to Meiringspoort from Swartberg Pass (33°19’55”S, 22°06’30”E; 3322AD); M. Cameron, 17 October 1984. i) PEM R8855; 2.5 km along road to Die Hell, west of Swartberg Pass (33°21’S, 22°03’E; 3322AC); C.R. Tilbury, 9 March 1993. j) PEM R9154; 3 km along road to Die Hell, west from Swartberg Pass (33°21’00”S, 22°01’00”E; 3322AC); C.R. Tilbury, 15 April 1994.

Remarks. Two additional paratype females in TMP (no. 39741–42). All PEM specimens in good condition, except PEM R8855 and 8856 with ventral incisions, PEM R9513 with right leg damaged for muscle extraction, and PEM R9154 with left leg damaged for muscle extraction.

 

Bradypodion ngomeense Tilbury & Tolley, 2009

Zootaxa, 2226:47; Figs. 3–9.

Holotype: PEM R16621; Ngome Forest (27°49’ S, 31°25’ E), KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa; D. Stuart-Fox & A. Moussalli, 6 January 2004.

Paratypes (15): a) PEM R5689–90; Ngome Forest, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa; C. Tilbury, 8 January 1999. b) PEM R16612–13, 16615, 16617–18, 16620, 16622; same details as holotype. c) PEM R16842–43; same loclaity as holotype; C. Tilbury, 5 January 2002. d) PEM R17518–21; Ngome Forest, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa; K. Tolley, 14 January 2008.

Remarks. All specimens in good condition, except for PEM R5689 and R5690 with lower tail muscle removed for DNA analysis, and PEM R1162, R16613, R16615, R16620, R16843, and R17518–21 with mid-ventral incisions.

 

Chamaeleo gutturalis Smith, 1849

Illustrations of the Zoology of South Africa, Appendix, page 3.

Current name: Bradypodion gutturale (Smith, 1849)

Neotype: PEM R5990; Karoo Botanical Gardens, Worcester, Western Cape, South Africa; W.R. Branch, 20 October 1999.

Remarks. Original types assumed lost (FitzSimons 1937; Tilbury 2010). Neotype designated by Tilbury (2010). Dorsal incision to remove DNA sample.

 

Chamaeleon ituriensis Schmidt, 1919

Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, 36(2):589; Plate XXXI, Fig. 2; Plate XXXII, Figs. 1–5.

Current name: Trioceros ituriensis (Schmidt, 1919)

Paratypes (2): PEM R9166–7 (formerly AMG 4314; AMNH 11530–31); Mejdje, Democratic Republic of the Congo; collector unknown, 10 July 1914.

Remarks. Types presumed transferred from AMNH to AMG, but no supporting evidence found. AMNH online database refers to these two specimens as paratypes.

 

Kinyongia mulyai Tilbury & Tolley, 2015

Zootaxa, 3905(3):359; Figs. 10–11.

Holotype: PEM R19199; Mount Nzawa (6°51.07’ S, 29° 35.87’ E), Moba District, Katanga Province, Democratic Republic of the Congo; C. Tilbury & I. Hattingh, 21 March 2010.

Remarks: Subadult male with mid-ventral incision.

 

Lophosaura melanocephla kentanica Hewitt, 1935

Records of the Albany Museum, 4:303; Plate XXVII, Fig. 3.

Current name: Bradypodion kentanicum (Hewitt, 1935)

Syntypes (2): PEM R16100–1 (formerly AMG 4538); Kentani, Eastern Cape, South Africa; Miss O. Abernethy, 7 March 1922.

Remarks. Collected by Miss O. Abernethy and presented to AMG by Miss Alice Pegler (Tilbury 2010). The description refers to two immature males as the types. Both specimens in very poor condition and dehydrated (presumably dried out at some stage). A dorsal photo of the head of one of the type specimens is illustrated on Plate XXVII figure 3. PEM R16100 is most similar to the figure.

 

Lophosaura ventralis var. karrooica Methuen & Hewitt, 1914

Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa, 4(2):103.

Current name: Bradypodion ventrale (Gray, 1845)

Holotype: PEM R8924 (formerly AMG 1789); Beaufort West, Western Cape, South Africa; Master Phillip Whaits, date unknown.

Paratype: PEM R8926 (formerly AMG 1851); Jansenville, Eastern Cape, South Africa; collector and date unknown.

Remarks. The type description clearly refers to AMG 1789 as the ‘type’. We thus follow Tilbury (2010) and refer to AMG 1789 (now PEM R8924) as the holotype. The type article also mentions three ‘co-types’ (which should be referred to as paratypes), two from the same locality (Beaufort West) and one from Jansenville. Specific reference is made to AMG 1713 and 1732. Both specimens are unaccounted for in the PEM. Although other species, listed under these same AMG numbers, are present and were collected from Beaufort West, only the AMG 1713 series of specimens states the collector as P. Whaits. Tilbury (2010) noted that one of the paratypes is in the TMP (no. 9497). John Hewitt may have donated AMG 1713 to the Transvaal Museum, where it was re-catalogued as TMP 9497. We could only find one specimen originating from Jansenville catalogued at the same time as the holotype. We are therefore confident that PEM R8926 is the additional Jansenville specimen that Hewitt referred to. The whereabouts of AMG 1732 remains unknown. Tolley et al. (2004) treated B. karooicum as a junior synonym of the widespread B. ventrale (Gray, 1845).

 

Nadzikambia baylissi Branch & Tolley, 2010

African Journal of Herpetology, 59(2):167; Figs. 2–5.

Holotype: PEM R18055; at the forest base camp in the extensive mid-altitude forest nestled under the eastern face of Mount Mabu (16°17’10.1”S, 36°24’02.2”E; ca. 967 m a.s.l..), Zambezia Province, Mozambique; W.R. Branch, J. Bayliss and W. Conradie, 30 May 2009.

Paratypes (3): a) PEM R18054 (female allotype); same collecting details as holotype, but collected on 29 May 2009. b) PEM R18053; same details as holotype, but collected on 27 May 2009. c) PEM R18056; same details as holotype, but collected on 2 June 2009.

Remarks. All with mid-ventral incisions.

 

Rhampholeon (Rhinodigitum) acuminatus Mariaux & Tilbury, 2006

The Herpetological Journal, 16(3):320; Figs. 4–5.

Paratype: PEM R16271; Nguru mountains, Nguru South Catchment Forest Reserve, Komkore Forest above Ubili village (6°2’29”S, 37°30’40.5”E; 1500–1600 m a.s.l.), Morogoro region, Tanzania; J. Mariaux & S. Loader, 21 October 2000.

 

Rhampholeon (Rhinodigitum) bruessoworum Branch, Bayliss & Tolley, 2014

Zootaxa, 3814(1):25; Fig. 9.

Holotype: PEM R20375; small patch of wet forest at the base of a granite inselberg of Mt. Inago (15°04’51”S, 37°23’37”E; ca. 1478 m a.s.l.), Zambezia Province, Mozambique; J. Bayliss, 5 September 2009.

Paratypes (2): PEM R20376 (male allotype) and PEM R20374; same collecting details as holotype.

 

Rhampholeon (Rhinodigitum) hattinghi Tilbury & Tolley, 2015

Zootaxa, 3905(3):355; Figs. 5–9.

Holotype: PEM R19194; Mount Nzawa (6° 51.07’S; 29° 35.87’E), Moba District, Katanga Province, Democratic Republic of the Congo; C. Tilbury and I. Hattingh, 21 March 2010.

Paratypes (5): PEM R19193, R19195–8; same collecting details as holotype.

 

Rhampholeon (Rhinodigitum) maspictus Branch, Bayliss & Tolley, 2014

Zootaxa, 3814(1):17; Figs. 5–6.

Holotype: PEM R18072; in the vicinity of the main forest base camp, Mt. Mabu (16º17’10.1”S, 36º24’02.2”E; 967 m a.s.l.), Zambezia Province, Mozambique; W.R. Branch, J. Bayliss and W. Conradie, 27 May 2009.

Paratypes (9): PEM R18061 (female allotype), R18059, R18068–70 and R18073–76; same collecting details as holotype.

 

Rhampholeon (Rhinodigitum) nebulauctor Branch, Bayliss & Tolley, 2014

Zootaxa, 3814(1):22; Fig. 7.

Holotype: PEM R17278; in shrub understory of evergreen forest on the south-eastern slopes of Mt. Chiperone Massif (16°30’25.9”S, 35°43’33.4”E; ca. 1000 m a.s.l.), Zambezia Province, Mozambique; J. Bayliss, 1 December 2008.

Paratypes (4): a) PEM R17281 (male allotype); same locality details as holotype but collected on 27 November 2018. b) PEM R17277 & R17279–80; same locality details as holotype but collected 26 November to 3 December 2008.

 

Rhampholeon tilburyi Branch, Bayliss & Tolley, 2014

Zootaxa, 3814(1):25; Fig. 8.

Holotype: PEM R14921; in the Ukalini Forest that nestles under the south face of the main Namuli Peak, Namuli Massif (15°22’S, 37°04’E; ca. 1550 m a.s.l.), Zambezia Province, Mozambique; local guide, 30 November 1998.

Paratypes (7): a) PEM R17132 (male allotype), R17134 & R17133; SDZ Cha Sarl Tea Estate at Gurué (15°26’51.6”S, 37°00’32.6”E; ca. 839 m a.s.l.), Namuli Massif, Zambezia Province, Mozambique; K.A. Tolley and S. van Noort, 26 May 2006. b) PEM R17135; SDZ Cha Sarl Tea Estate at Gurué (15°26’42.8”S, 37°00’19.2”E); K.A. Tolley and S. van Noort, 26 May 2006. c) PEM R17131; SDZ Cha Sarl Tea Estate at Gurué (15°26’49”S, 37°00’29”E); K.A. Tolley and S. van Noort, 26 May 2006. d) PEM R20372–3; Muretha Plateau (15°23’26”S, 37°02’03”E; ca. 1804 m a.s.l.), Namuli Massif, Zambezia Province, Mozambique; J. Bayliss, 27 May 2007.

 

CORDYLIDAE

Cordylus beraducci Broadley & Branch, 2002

African Journal of Herpetology, 51(1):13; Fig. 6.

Paratypes (2): PEM R1292–93; Oldonyo Sambu (04º 05’S, 36º 19’E), Arusha Region, Tanzania; J. Beraduccii, collected late 1999.

Remarks. Both paratypes with mid-ventral incisions.

 

Cordylus meculae Branch, Rödel & Marais, 2005

African Journal of Herpetology, 54(2):132; Figs. 1–2.

Holotype: PEM R16166; summit rock outcrops of Serra Mecula (12°03’11”S, 37°38’49”E; 1029 m a.s.l.), Niassa Game Reserve, Niassa Province, Mozambique; W.R. Branch, M.O. Rödel and J. Marais, 27 October 2003.

Paratypes (8): a) PEM R16163 (male allotype), R16164–5; same data as holotype. b) PEM R16180, 16184 [wrongly listed in as R16182 in type description], Serra Mecula (12°02’25”S, 37°38’32”E; approx. 1200 m a.s.l.); 29 October 2003. c) PEM R16198; Serra Mecula (12°03’30”S, 37°38’22”E; approx. 1100 m a.s.l.); 31 October 2003. d) PEM R16202–3; western slopes of Serra Mecula (12°02’46”S, 37°37’21”E; 643 m a.s.l.); 1 November 2003. All collected by W.R. Branch, M.O. Rödel and J. Marais.

Remarks. All with ventral incisions except for the holotype and two paratypes (PEM R16180 & 16184).

 

Platysaurus broadleyi Branch & Whiting, 1997

African Journal of Herpetology, 46(2):126; Fig. 1.

Paratypes (3): PEM R12466 (female allotype), R12467 & 12578; 400 m West of Augrabies Falls (18°35’34”S, 20°20’13”E, 2820CB; approx. 559 m a.s.l.), Northern Cape Province, South Africa; W. R. Branch, 22 June 1996.same details as allotype.

Remarks: Female allotype (PEM R12466) with more than half of the tail missing. PEM R12467 with left leg stripped from skin to expose muscle. According to the original publication the holotype and other paratypes are in TMP (no.79828), while one additional non-type PEM specimen is listed (PEM R12257).

 

Zonurus breyeri Van Dam, 1921

Annals of the Transvaal Museum, 7:239; Plates 1–2.

Current name: Smaug breyeri (Van Dam, 1921)

Paratype: PEM R5564 (formerly AMG 4313, originally TMP 3158); Geelhoutkop (Driefontein), Waterberg District, Transvaal [=Limpopo Province], South Africa; G.P.F. van Dam and H.G. Breyer, January 1918

Remarks. The original description lists all types (a series of four specimens) in the Transvaal Museum, although the TMP catalogue indicates that TMP 3771 was sent to J. Hewitt in AMG on 18 February 1925 (now in PEM). Specimen is in fair condition, with a detached tail.

 

Zonurus cordylus rhodesianus Hewitt, 1933

Occasional Papers of the Rhodesian Museum, 2: 48; Plate 9, Fig. 3.

Current name: Cordylus rhodesianus (Hewitt, 1933)

Syntypes (3): PEM R5294–6 (formerly AMG 6583); Monte Cassino, Macheke, Zimbabwe; Rev. K. Tasman.

Remarks. Type series consists of eight specimens, two in NMZB (nos. 1222–3) and the remainder in the PEM according to the description. Subsequently, two have been donated to TMP (nos.1485–6) and one to MCZ (R 33448). Specimen PEM R5294 can, with confidence, be associated with Plate 9, fig 3, based on the body shape and the ventral cut exposing part of the trachea. All three remaining PEM types are in good condition with ventral incisions from pectoral region to above anal plate. PEM R5296 has a detached tail tied onto specimen.

 

Zonurus cordylus tasmani Power, 1930

Annals of the Transvaal Museum, 14(1):12; Plate I, Fig. 4.

Current name: Cordylus cordylus (Linnaeus, 1758)

Syntypes (13): a) PEM R13518–22 (formerly AMG 5183); Dunbrody ‘Blue cliff’, Uitenhage Division, Eastern Cape, South Africa; Rev. K. Tasman, 26 November 1925. b) PEM R13515–7 (formerly AMG 5193); Dunbrody ‘Blue cliff’, Uitenhage Division, Eastern Cape, South Africa; Rev. K. Tasman, 5 December 1925. b) PEM R13513–4, 13522 (formerly AMG 5917); Dunbrody, Sundays River; J. Hewitt, 13 September 1928. d) PEM R13539 (formerly AMG 5166); Dunbrody, Sundays River; J. Hewitt, date unknown.

Remarks. The original description makes no reference to the number of specimens and or repositories to which they were deposited, although Power (1930) listed (in the comparative table) that he examined 13 specimens in total. Port Elizabeth Museum has numerous AMG series of specimens collected at the type locality, e.g. AMG 5166 (1), 5183 (6), 5193 (3), 5197 (3), 7021 (4), 7053 (10), 7087(2). Only AMG 5183 and 5193 are listed as being collected by Rev. K. Tasman on 5 December 1925 and 26 November 1925, respectively. Series AMG 5166 and 5197 were collected by J. Hewitt. The series AMG 5197 was collected on 13 September 1928, well before Power’s description. AMG 5166 is the oldest running number and most likely the specimen Hewitt (1909) referred to. Thus all the above material could have been accessible to Power and they total 13 specimens as indicated in his description. We thus assign all the above to the type series. Series AMG 7021, 7053, 7087 (no date provided) must have been collected after the description and are topotypical only. One specimen is depicted in the type description and can be identified with accuracy to PEM R13583.

 

Zonurus namaquensis Methuen & Hewitt, 1914

Annals of the Transvaal Museum, 4(3):137.

Current name: Namazonurus namaquensis (Methuen & Hewitt, 1914)

Paratype: PEM R12388 (formerly AMG 1612, originally TMP 3158); at Narudas Süd, Great Karasberg Mountains, Namibia; 30 December 1912.

Remarks. In the type description it is clearly stated that the type [holotype] is TMP 3163. Therefore all remaining specimens are paratypes. One paratype (TMP 3158) was sent to AMG (now in PEM). The specimen has an anterior ventral incision.

 

GEKKONIDAE

Afroedura gorongosa Branch, Guyton, Schmitz, Barej, Naskrecki, Farooq, Verburgt & Rödel, 2017

Zootaxa, 4324(1):150; Figs. 4–7.

Paratype: PEM R22220 (formerly ZMB 83291); western flank of Mount Gorongosa (18°28’04.3”S, 34°02’53.2”E; 1038 m a.s.l.), Gorongosa National Park, Sofala Province, Mozambique; M.-O. Rödel and M.F. Barej, 11 December 2015.

Remarks. Originally catalogued into ZMB and donated to PEM (September 2016). Specimen is in a good condition with incision on left thigh.

 

Geko wahlbergii Smith, 1849

Illustrations of the Zoology of South Africa, Plate 75 and associated unnumbered text.

Current name: Homopholis wahlbergii (Smith, 1849)

Neotype: PEM R17603; Jozini Dam, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa; W.R. Branch, J. Marais and A. Bauer, 29 June 2008.

Remarks. Broadley et. al. (2014) designated PEM R17603 as a neotype as Smith (1849) never designated types. This specimen has a small ventral incision and its tail is missing.

 

Hemidactylus tasmani Hewitt, 1932

Annals of the Natal Museum, 7(1):105; Plate VI, Fig. 5.

Syntypes (2): PEM R16077–8 (formerly AMG 5656); Driefontein, near Gwelo, Zimbabwe; Rev. K. Tasman, ‘10 September 1927’.

Remarks. Hewitt (1932) referred to an adult male and female as the ‘types’, but also mentioned one other specimen from Holy Cross. No specimens were illustrated, but specific emphasis was placed on the measurements of the adult female (PEM R16077). Both type specimens have a ventral incision. PEM R16078 has a detached tail and PEM R16077 has a flap of skin missing on the posterior dorsal part of the head. PEM has two additional specimens PEM R16079–80 (formerly AMG 5840) from Holy Cross that can only be referred to as ‘additional material’.

 

Lygodactylus bradfieldi Hewitt, 1932

Annals of the Natal Museum, 7(1):126; Plate VI, Fig. 10.

Syntypes (16): PEM R14574–82, 14586–92 (formerly AMG 6075); Quickborn near Okahandja, Namibia; Mr. R. D. Bradfield, 14 May 1929.

Remarks. The description refers to a series of adult males and females comprising the type series. Although a specimen is illustrated, none of the existing PEM material could be associated with it. Most of the remaining types have either partly or fully detached tails. One specimen (MCZ R33443) is listed as a syntype in the MCZ online database, and must have been sent to Loveridge by Hewitt.

 

Lygodactylus capensis mossambica Loveridge, 1920

Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London, 1920:131.

Current name: Lygodactylus grotei Sternfeld, 1911

Paratype: PEM R16092 (formerly AMG 5178); Lumbo, Mozambique; A. Loveridge, ‘11 July 1918’.

Remarks. The type description mentions a total of 50 specimens collected at the type locality deposited in the BMNH, with some co-types subsequently donated to National Museum of Wales, Manchester Museum, American Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Harvard University and Nairobi Museum. No mention is made about a donation of specimens to the AMG. A hand-written label initialed by A. Loveridge and found in the type bottle refers to the AM specimen as a paratype, indicating that Loveridge sent this specimen (it was probably part of the MCZ material) to Hewitt at AMG (now in PEM).

 

Lygodactylus regulus Portik, Travers, Bauer & Branch, 2013

Zootaxa, 3710(5):415; Figs. 6–8.

Paratypes (2): a) PEM R14922; Mt. Namuli, ridge leading to Marakuni Ridge (1537AC, 1800 m a.s.l.), Zambezia Province, Mozambique; P. Ryan, 30 November 1998. b) PEM R20277; Mt. Namuli, Muretha Plateau (15°23’04.5”S, 37°03’13.6”E; 1878 m a.s.l.), Zambezia Province, Mozambique; J. Bayliss, 27 May 2007.

Remarks. PEM R14922 in good condition, whereas PEM R20277 has a crushed head.

 

Lygodactylus stevensoni Hewitt, 1926b

Annals of the Natal Museum, 5:445; Plate XXV, Figs. 3– 4.

Syntypes (3): PEM R16074–6 (formerly AMG 5053); Khami Ruins, Zimbabwe; R.H.R. Stevenson, 13 April 1925.

Remarks. The description refers to only three specimens as ‘Types’. One specimen is illustrated in Plate XXV, figure 3, and can be associated with confidence to PEM R16074. All specimens in good condition, except for PEM R16075, which lacks a tail.

 

Oedura amatolica Hewitt, 1925

Records of the Albany Museum, 3:349; Plate XVI, Fig. 3; Plate XVII, Fig. 2.

Current name: Afroedura amatolica (Hewitt, 1925)

Syntypes (3): PEM R9439–41 (formerly AMG 4922); the summit of the Amatola Range near Hogsback, Eastern Cape, South Africa; Miss O. Siggs and Mr. R. Essex, September 1924.    

Remarks. The description refers to the types as being two adult males and one female. No holotype was designated, although a male (PEM R9439) is illustrated in plates XVI and XVII. All specimens are in good condition, but the female syntype (PEM R9440) is without the posterior two thirds of its tail.

 

Oedura karroica wilmoti Hewitt, 1926b

Annals of the Natal Museum, 5:446; Plate XXV, Figs. 1–2.

Current name: Afroedura karroica (Hewitt, 1926)

Syntypes (25): PEM R9479–503 (formerly AMG 5069); Tarkastad, Eastern Cape Province, South Africa; Mr. C. Windsor Wilmot, June 1925.

Remarks. The description states that the ‘types’ are in the Albany Museum (now PEM) and NMP and that they are represented by a series of 24 adults (p. 37). The original bottle of type specimens received from AMG has a total of 25 specimens (one is a juvenile – now PEM R9491). One lot of specimens still has original labels: ‘AM. 5069 Tarkastad C.W. Wilmot’, while the other lacks original labels. It is unclear if the latter is part of the type series or not. Two different specimens are illustrated in the plates. We matched a male (PEM R9495) and a female (PEM R9497) to those illustrated. Four specimens listed as syntypes in MCZ (R 22090–3) still bear the original label of AMG 5137, and although it states that they originated from Tarkastad and were collected by C.W. Wilmot, they must be considered only as topotypes. The PEM has an additional nine specimens (now PEM R5935–43) bearing the same number, AMG 5137, as the MCZ material, which further supports that John Hewitt preferred to exchange topotypes rather than primary types. All specimens are in good to fair condition, but PEM R9483, 9487, 9488 and 9493 have detached tails.

 

Oedura pondolia Hewitt, 1926b

Records of the Albany Museum, 3:346; Plate XVI, Fig. 2.

Current name: Afroedura pondolia (Hewitt, 1926)

Syntypes (3): PEM R16069–71 (formerly AMG 4897); Mbotyi River mouth, Lusikisiki, Eastern Cape Province, South Africa; Mr. W. Roberts, ‘22 August 1924’.

Remarks. The type description refers only to ‘three examples’ as being the types. Two adult males (PEM R16069 and 16070) are illustrated. All specimens are in good condition. No collecting date is provided in the description, but the label reads ‘22 August 1924’.

 

Oedura tembulica Hewitt, 1926a

Annals of the South African Museum, 20(6):415

Current name: Afroedura tembulica (Hewitt, 1926)

Syntypes (19): PEM R9448–66 (formerly AMG 5033, 5044, 5028); Cofimvaba, Tembuland, Eastern Cape Province, South Africa; Mr. C.W. Wilmot, 28 May 1925.

Remarks. Hewitt did not designate a type or illustrate any specimens. The type series consists of adult (PEM R9448, 9452, 9454–56, 9491–62, 9464–9465) and juvenile (PEM R9449–50, 94553, 9457–60, 9463, 9466) material. All are in good condition, except some with detached tails. One of the original syntypes was exchanged by Hewitt (from the AMG) to MCZ (now R 22094) with the series of Oedura karroica wilmoti (see above) on 22 January 1926 according to MCZ’s online database.

 

Oedura transvaalica Hewitt, 1925

Records of the Albany Museum, 3:350; Plate XVII, Fig. 1.

Current name: Afroedura transvaalica (Hewitt, 1925)

Syntypes (2): PEM R16072–73 (formerly AMG 5114; TMP 3491–2); N’jele River, Soutpansberg district, Limpopo Province, South Africa; Mr. G.P.F van Dam, June 1916.

Remarks. The original description lists all types (a series of nine specimens) in the Transvaal Museum, although Mashinini & Mahlangu (2013) indicate that TMP 3491–2 were sent to J. Hewitt at AMG on 3 August 1925. Both specimens are in fair condition, but PEM R16073 has a detached tail.

 

Pachydactylus austeni Hewitt, 1923

Annals of the Natal Museum, 5:67; Plate IV, Figs. 1–2.

Syntype: PEM R12387 (formerly AMG 4662); Port Nolloth, Northern Cape Province, South Africa; W. Austen, June 1922.

Remarks. Two other type specimens present in the NMP, according to the original description.

 

Pachydactylus capensis oculatus Hewitt, 1927

Records of the Albany Museum, 3(5):394; Pl XXII, Fig. 1.

Current name: Pachydactylus oculatus (Hewitt, 1927)

Holotype: PEM R11953 (formerly AMG 5304); farm Cyrilhurts, about six miles from Tarkastad, Eastern Cape Province, South Africa; Mr. R. Essex, August 1925.

Remarks. The description does not mention where the specimens were deposited. A specimen agreeing in appearance with the illustrated specimen in the original description is present in the PEM. The only difference is that the original label reads ‘King’s Farm, Tarkastad’ and not ‘farm Cyrilhurts about six miles from Tarkastad’. One more juvenile specimen from the same locality (PEM R11928) is present in the PEM. Hewitt specifically states the ‘type’ (holotype) to be an adult male. No further types are listed. Hewitt considered it a form between maculatus and capensis, calling it Pachydactylus maculatus oculatus in his plate. Loveridge (1947) subsequently synonymised it with P. maculatus, but it was later elevated to a full species (Branch 1988).

 

Pachydactylus capensis werneri Hewitt, 1935

Records of the Albany Museum, 4:315; Plate XXIX, Fig. 3.

Current name: Pachydactylus werneri (Hewitt, 1935)

Lectotype: PEM R16049 (formerly AMG 6613); Khan River, Namibia; R.D. Bradfield, August 1925.

Paralectotype: PEM R16048 (formerly AMG 6613); same collection details as lectotype.

Remarks. Lectotype allocation by Bauer et al. (2006).

 

Pachydactylus carinatus Bauer, Lamb & Branch, 2006

Proceedings of the California Academy of Sciences, 26:673; Figs. 101–105.

Paratype: PEM R16629; Hottentots Paradys Overlook (2816BD), Richtersveld National Park, Northern Cape Province, South Africa; W.R. Branch, 25 September 1995.

Remarks. The specimen has a detached tail.

 

Pachydactylus etultra Branch, Bauer, Jackman & Heinicke, 2011

Breviora, 524:4; Figs. 1–3.

Paratypes (4): a) PEM R17293; Sossusvlei Desert Lodge (24°46’45.3”S, 15°53’17.8”E; 2415DD; 896 m a.s.l.), Namib-Rand Nature Reserve, Hardap Region, Maltahöhe District, Namibia; W.R. Branch, 20 April 2007. b) PEM R17294; same details as above but collected 21 April 2007. c) PEM R17295 & R17297; same details as above but collected by W.R. Branch, D. Branch and V. Swanepoel, 22 April 2007.

 

Pachydactylus haackei Branch, Bauer, & Good, 1996 Pachydactylus kladaroderma Branch, Bauer, & Good, 1996

South African Journal of Zoology, 31(2):61; Fig. 2b.

Paratypes (6): a) PEM R9283–4; Farm Kuchanas (27°02’S, 18°43’E; 2718BA), Great Karasberg, Namibia; W.R. Branch, R. Shine, P. Harlow and J. Webb, 30 June 1994. b) PEM R7606; 1.3 km SE towards Nicodaemus from the top of Helskloof Pass (28°20’37”S, 16°59’1”E; 2816BD; 677 m a.s.l.), Richtersveld National Park, Northern Cape Province, South Africa; W.R. Branch and R. Hall, 15 September 1992. c) PEM R7358–9; ‘Akkedis Drive’ (28°10’35”S, 17°1’13”E; 2817AA), Richtersveld National Park, Northern Cape Province, South Africa; W.R. Branch and R. Hall, 1 September 1992. d) PEM R7305; north-west of Koeroedals (2817AC), Richtersveld National Park, Northern Cape Province, South Africa; collector and date unknown.

Remarks. The holotype (PEM R9282) and a paratype (PEM R10941) were donated to the SMWN. Two additional paratypes are in CAS (no. 193362) and AMNH (no. 141230).

 

Pachydactylus kladaroderma Branch, Bauer, & Good, 1996

South African Journal of Zoology, 31(2):58, Figs. 2a & 3.

Holotype: PEM R11195; ‘Dolerite Towers’ (32°15’09’’S, 22°34’07’’E; 1077 m a.s.l.), Molteno Pass, Nuweveldberge, Karoo National Park, Western Cape Province, South Africa; W.R. Branch, G.V. Haagner, A.M. Bauer, and C. Weatherby, 8 February 1995.

Paratypes (9): a) PEM R11193–94; same collection details as holotype. b) PEM R6544; type locality but collected by G.V. Haagner, A. Haagner and A. Vlok, 10 October 1991. c) PEM R11197–98; roadside cutting in Molteno Pass (32°12’34”S, 22°33’35”E; 3222BA; 1164 m a.s.l.), Nuweveldberge, Karoo National Park, Western Cape Province, South Africa; G.V. Haagner, 8 February 1995. d) PEM R11200; top of Molteno Pass (32°10’24”S, 22°32’55”E; 1682 m a.s.l.), Nuweveldberge, Western Cape Province, South Africa; GV. Haagner, 8 Febrary 1995. e) PEM R11199; Sak River, Nuweveldberge (32°3’56”S, 22°27’01”E; 3222AB; 1504 m a.s.l.), Western Cape Province, South Africa; W.R. Branch, G.V. Haagner, A.M. Bauer, and C. Weatherby, 8 February 1995. f) PEM R4370 & R4660; Karoo National Park (3222AD, 3322BC); W.R. Branch, October 1984.

Remarks: Additional paratypes: CAS 198285, 198286, 198288 and LSUMZ 56974.

 

Pachydactylus latirostris Hewitt, 1923

Annals of the Natal Museum, 5:69; Plate IV, Fig. 3.

Current name: Pachydactylus latirostris Hewitt, 1923

Syntypes (2): PEM R12383–4 (formerly AMG 2103); Victoria West, Northern Cape Province, South Africa; Mr. B. Marais, date unknown.

Remarks: The description lists two specimens in AMG (now PEM) and one in NMP. At some stage the AMG material must have dried up and been damaged. Although the tail is missing, the body deformed and colour bleached, we can confidently assign PEM R12384 to the specimen illustrated in the original description. The type description mentions an additional specimen from between ‘Zwaart Modder and Rietfontein’ from the Kimberly Museum [McGregor Museum] send to AMG, now PEM R12385. Bauer et al. (2011) elevated all subspecies of Pachydactylus mariquensis recognised by Loveridge (1947) to specific status, including P. latirostris.

 

Pachydactylus maculatus albomarginatus Hewitt, 1932

Annals of the Natal Museum; 7(1):121; Plate VI, Figs. 6–7.

Current name: Pachydactylus oculatus Hewitt, 1927 (fide De Waal, 1978)

Syntypes (3): PEM R7625, R7632, R7634 (formerly AMG 6368); Norvals Pont, Colesberg, Eastern Cape, South Africa; Mr. B. Peers, ‘23 June 1930’.

 

Pachydactylus maculatus microlepis Hewitt, 1935

Records of the Albany Museum, 4:312.

Current name: Pachydactylus maculatus Gray, 1845

Holotype: PEM R7731 (formerly AMG 5353); summit of Coetzees Berg near Pearston, Eastern Cape Province, South Africa; Mr. Ben Marais, date unknown.

Remarks: Loveridge (1947) considered this a junior synonym of Pachydactylus maculatus.

 

Pachydactylus mentalis Hewitt, 1926c

Annals of the South African Museum, 20:475; Plate XLIV, Fig. 1.

Current name: Pachydactylus capensis (Smith, 1846)

Syntypes (2): PEM R8453, R8375 (formerly AMG 5008); Longhope, on the Great Fish River, Eastern Cape, South Africa; Miss D. Cotton, date unknown.

Remarks: Type description refers to only two specimens as ‘types’. PEM R8375 is illustrated in the plate. Both specimens are in good condition.

 

Pachydactylus monicae Bauer, Lamb & Branch, 2006

Proceedings of the California Academy of Sciences, 26:664; Figs. 82–87.

Paratypes (2): a) PEM R7626; Reuning Mine (2816BB), Richtersveld National Park, Northern Cape Province, South Africa; H.H. Braack, date unknown. b) PEM R1192; Sendelingsdrif (28°07’S, 16°53’E; 50 m a.s.l.), Richtersveld National Park, Northern Cape Province, South Africa; W.R. Branch, A.M. Bauer and D.A. Good, 20 September 1995.

Remarks: Both paratypes are bleached, and PEM R7626 has a missing tail.

 

Pachydactylus montanus onscepensis Hewitt, 1935

Records of the Albany Museum, 4:318.

Current name: Pachydactylus montanus Werner, 1910

Holotype: PEM R16050 (formerly AMG 6879); Onscephans [=Onseepkans] on the Orange River, not far from Pella, Northern Cape Province, South Africa; Dr. H. Maughan Brown, date unknown.

Remarks: The type description refers to one ‘type’, which is thus the holotype. Holotype with a detached tail. The description mentions additional non-type material, namely PEM R16051 (formerly AM 2593), from Kakamas.

 

Pachydactylus oreophilus McLachlan & Spence, 1967

Cimbebasia, 21:4; Figs. 1–2.

Holotype: PEM R1921 (formerly PEM 1503/67 [old PEM catalogue number]); 20 miles west of Sesfontein, Namibia; G. Mclachlan, 16 October 1965.

Paratypes (2): PEM R1919 (formerly PEM 1503/68 [allotype male]), PEM R1920 (formerly PEM 1503/69); same collection details as holotype.

Remarks: The holotype is a female with a posterior ventral incision. The male (PEM R1920) was described as the allotype.

 

Pachydactylus punctatus amoenoides Hewitt, 1935

Records of the Albany Museum, 4:314; Plate XXVII, Fig. 3.

Current name: Pachydactylus punctatus amoenoides Hewitt, 1935

Syntypes (2): PEM R8070–1 (formerly AMG 5475); Luderitzbucht (=Lüderitz Bay), Namibia; Miss E. Saunders, ‘21 December 1926’.

Remarks: The description refers only to two specimens as being types. Both specimens are in poor condition, with ventral incisions. PEM R8071 with a missing tail. The description further mentions a third specimen PEM R8072 (formerly AMG 6421) from Swakopmund collected by R.D. Bradfield, assignable to this species and thus can only be regarded as additional non-type material.

             

Pachydactylus rugosus frater Hewitt, 1935

Records of the Albany Museum, 4:316.

Current name: Pachydactylus rugosus Smith, 1849

Holotype: PEM R16066 (formerly AMG 6458); Heichamchab, Namibia; Mr. R.D. Bradfield, unknown date.

Remarks. Holotype with detached tail and ventral longitudinal incision. Hewitt also referred additional material (Kakamas - PEM R13004, R13449, R16063; Rietfontein - PEM R16067 and Oncep – PEM16064) to the same species.

 

Phyllodactylus braacki Good, Bauer & Branch, 1996

African Journal of Herpetology, 45(2):49.

Current name: Goggia braacki (Good, Bauer & Branch, 1996)

Holotype: PEM R4361; Nuweveld escarpment near radio mast (32°16’S, 22°30’E; 3222BC; approx. 1800 m a.s.l.), Karoo National Park, Western Cape Province, South Africa W.R. Branch, 28 August 1984.

Paratypes (4): PEM R11890, 11922, 12379 & 12380; Mountain View, 4.9 km from Puttervlei Gate, Karoo National Park, Western Cape Province, South Africa; W.R. Branch, A.M. Bauer and D.A. Good, 10 September 1995.

Remarks: Type series in good condition, except for PEM R12380 with a detached tail.

 

Phyllodactylus essexi Hewitt, 1925

Records of the Albany Museum, 3:343; Plate XV, Fig. 2

Current name: Goggia essexi (Hewitt, 1925)

Lectotype: PEM R11157; found under large stones on a kopje at the farm Hounslow, near Grahamstown, Eastern Cape Province, South Africa; J. Hewitt, September 1924.

Paralectotype: PEM R11156; same details as lectotype but, according to the original description, collected by Miss. M.L. Winslow.

Remarks: Two adult specimens are illustrated in the plates. Branch et al. (1995) designated the male as the lectotype and the remaining juvenile as the paralectotype.

 

Phyllodactylus gemmulus Bauer, Branch & Good, 1995

Occasional Papers of the Museum of Natural Sciences, Louisiana State University, 71:2; Figs. 1–2.

Current name: Goggia gemmula (Bauer, Branch & Good, 1995)

Paratypes (14): a) PEM R7786–93; Swartpoort (28°08’10”S, 16°59’34”E), Richtersveld National Park, Northern Cape Province, South Africa; W.R. Branch and R.J. Hall, 14 September 1992. b) PEM R7372–73, 7378–80; Akkedisdrive (28°08’02”S, 16°59’34”E), Richtersveld National Park, Northern Cape Province, South Africa; W.R. Branch, 2 September 1992. c) PEM R9209; near road turning to Pokkiespram (28 8’13”S, 16 58’14”E), Richtersveld National Park, Northern Cape South Africa; W.R. Branch, 5 April 1994.

Remarks: The paratype PEM R9209 is currently unaccounted for.

 

Phyllodactylus hewitti Branch, Bauer & Good, 1995

Journal of the Herpetological Association of Africa, 44(2):42; Fig. 1b, c.

Current name: Goggia hewitti (Branch, Bauer & Good, 1995)

Holotype: PEM R7829; 3 km east from Swartberg Pass along summit road on Groot Swartberg (33°20’40”S, 22°04’17”E; 3322AC; 1403 m a.s.l.), Western Cape Province, South Africa; M.S. Branch, W.R. Branch and G.V. Haagner, 19 November 1992.

Paratypes (13): a) PEM R7828; same collection details as holotype. b) PEM R1835 & 1837; 2.3 km north of road to Gamkakloofk along Swartberg Pass on Groot Swartberg (3322AC); W.R. Branch and M.S. Smale, 30 October 1979. c) PEM R1838; at turn-of to Gamkakloof on Swartberg Pass, Groot Swartberg (3322AC); W.R. Branch and M.S. Smale, 30 October 1979. d) PEM R7853–4, 7856, 7859; Northern slopes of Blesberg, Klein Swartberg (33°24’46”S, 22°43’ 55”E; 3322Bc; 1442 m a.s.l.); M.S. Branch, W.R. Branch and G.V. Haagner, 22 November 1992. e) PEM R7864–8; Top of Oorlogskloof, Klein Swartberg (33°24’53”S, 22°45’30”E; 3322Bc; 1442 m a.s.l.); M.S. Branch, W.R. Branch and G.V. Haagner, 22 November 1992.

 

Phyllodactylus hexaporus Branch, Bauer & Good, 1995

Journal of the Herpetological Society of Africa, 44(2):41.

Current name: Goggia hexapora (Branch, Bauer & Good, 1995)

Holotype: PEM R10993; Pakhuis Pass, Cedarberg, Clanwilliam District, Western Cape Province, South Africa; G.R. McLachlan, 8 October 1961.

Paratypes (15): a) PEM R2053; same locality and collector as holotype, but collected October 1954. b) PEM R10980–3, R10985–88, R10990; same locality and collector as holotype, but collected 21 November 1964. c) PEM R10995, R10997–11000; same collection details as holotype.

             

Phyllodactylus porphyreus cronwrighti Hewitt, 1937a

Annals of the Natal Museum, 8:205.

Current name: Afrogecko porphyreus (Hewitt, 1937)

Syntypes (4): PEM R16085–6,16088 (formerly AMG 7791) and PEM R16087 (formerly AMG 7649); Cape St Francis, Eastern Cape Province, South Africa; Mr. Fred Cronwright, date unknown.    Remarks: Type description refers to three adults and one juvenile, but neither provides specimen data nor illustrates any of the specimens. PEM R16085 has a damaged head, and in PEM R16086 the tail is missing. One additional specimen from Karatara, Knysna (PEM R16089, formerly AM 5922) was referred to this species in the original description.

 

Phyllodactylus porphyreus namaquensis Hewitt, 1935

Records of the Albany Museum, 4:320; Plate XXIX, Fig. 4.

Current name: Afrogecko porphyreus (Hewitt, 1935)

Holotype: PEM R16091 (formerly AMG 6943); Bitterfontein, Western Cape, South Africa; Mr. V.S. Peers; 28 August 1933.

Remarks: Specimen in good condition, except for a longitudinal ventral incision.

 

Rhoptropus bradfieldi Hewitt, 1935

Records of the Albany Museum, 4:307.

Syntypes (3): PEM R15874–6 (formerly AMG 6575); Messum River, Namibia; Mr. R. D. Bradfield, date unknown.

Remarks. The description refers to only three specimens (two adults and one juvenile) in the type series. PEM R15876 with missing tail. Additional non-type material mentioned in type description: Ugab (PEM R15877–9), Heichamachab (PEM R15880–3), Great Omaruru River (PEM R15885) and Gorob (PEM R15584).

 

GERRHOSAURIDAE

Cordylosaurus trivittatus australis Hewitt, 1932

Annals of the Natal Museum, 7(1):114; Plate VI, Fig. 5.

Current name: Cordylosaurus subtessellatus (Smith, 1844)

Syntypes (2): PEM R16105–6 (formerly AMG 6111); between Garies and Kammiesberg in Namaqualand district, Northern Cape Province, South Africa; Mr. B. Peers, ‘15 August 1929’.

Remarks. The type description refers to two specimens as the types. One specimen is illustrated in the type description. We can confidently assign PEM R16105 to the illustration. Specimens in reasonable condition, except both specimens with detached tails. The type description also refers to a juvenile specimen from Kakamas (PEM R1607) and an adult from Steinkopf (PEM R15435) which resembles this form closely and is regarded as non-type material.

 

Tetradactylus bilineatus Hewitt, 1926a

Annals of the South African Museum, 20:417

Current name: Tetradactylus tetradactylus (Daudin, 1802)

Holotype: PEM R9550; Burghersdorp [=Burgersdorp], Eastern Cape Province, South Africa; Dr. R. Boom, March 1913.

Remarks: Type in poor condition with much of the tail missing (noted in type description). Branch (1990) discussed the validity of this species and symonimised it with Tetradactylus tetradactylus (Daudin, 1802).

 

Tetradactylus fitzsimonsi Hewitt, 1915

Annals of the Transvaal Museum, 5(2):101.

Syntype: PEM R4439; Schoemachers Kop [=Schoenmakerkop] near Port Elizabeth, Eastern Cape Province, South Africa; collector and date unknown.

Remarks: Although FitzSimons (1943) lists the cotypes as being in Port Elizabeth and Albany Museum, this must have been in error as the type description clearly states two specimens loaned to Hewitt from the Port Elizabeth Museum’s director F.W. FitzSimons. However, only the larger specimen (Schoenmakerskop) is currently extant in the PEM. Both Hewitt (1915, 1937b) and subsequent authors questioned the second smaller specimen from Kroonstad and subsequently disregarded it (FitzSimons 1943; Loveridge 1942; Branch 1990) and considered the taxon to be restricted to the Port Elizabeth region.The original label gives no details for collector or the date of collection. Based on consistent morphological differences, Bates (2014) treats this as a full species.

 

LACERTIDAE

Basutosaura cottrelli Hewitt, 1925   

Records of the Albany Museum, 3:356; Fig. p. 358.

Current name: Tropidosaura cottrelli (Hewitt, 1925)

Holotype: PEM R16093; Nemahadi Police Camp near Mont aux Sources, Lesotho; Mr. J.A. Cottrell, January 1925.

Remarks. Type description refers to a single specimen as the ‘Type’, therefore PEM R16093 is regarded as the holotype. The specimen has a posterior ventral incision exposing the intestines and the posterior half of tail missing, but showing signs of regeneration.

 

Eremias nitida garambensis Schmidt, 1919

Bulletin of the American Museum (Natural History), 39(2):511.

Current name: Heliobolus nitidus garambensis (Schmidt, 1919).

Paratype: PEM R13994 (formerly AMNH 10692 and later AMG 4314); Garamba, Democratic Republic of the Congo; collector unknown, 1 May 1912.

Remarks. No evidence of transfer from AMNH to AMG. AMNH online database refers to this specimen as a paratype. Tail lost post-mortem and unaccounted for.

 

Pedioplanis haackei Conradie, Branch, Measey & Tolley, 2012

African Journal of Herpetology, 61(2):11; Fig 3A, B.

Holotype: PEM R18465; along the road to Tambo (15°52’33.8”S, 12°12’21.0”E; 1512CC; 196 m a.s.l.), Namibe Province, Angola; W.R. Branch, W. Conradie, G.J. Measey and K.A. Tolley, 19 January 2009.

Paratypes (14): a) PEM R18461 (female allotype); Red Canyons (15°44’45.5”S, 12°8’23.6”E; 1512CA; 81 m a.s.l.), Namibe Province, Angola; W.R. Branch, W. Conradie, G.J. Measey and K.A. Tolley, 18 January 2009. b) PEM R18462–4 and R18466–75; all collected by W.R. Branch, W. Conradie, G.J. Measey and K.A. Tolley, at various localities on the road between Namibe and Espinheira (see Conradie et al. 2012), 12–23 January 2009.

             

Pedioplanis huntleyi Conradie, Branch, Measey & Tolley, 2012

African Journal of Herpetology, 61(2):15; Fig. 5A, B.

Holotype: PEM R18479; road to Oncocua, 7 km from Iona (16°51’29.9”S, 12°36’45.9”E; 1612DC; 803 m a.s.l.), Namibe Province, Angola; W.R. Branch, W. Conradie, G.J. Measey and K.A. Tolley, 21 January 2009.

Paratypes (14): a) PEM R18487 (female allotype); 14 km west of Moimba (16°40’46.1”S, 12°58’26.3”E; 1612DB; 684 m a.s.l.), Namibe Province, Angola; W. Conradie, 24 January 2009. b) PEM R18476–8, R18480–86, and R18488–90; collected by W.R. Branch, W. Conradie, G.J. Measey and K.A. Tolley, at various localities near Espinheira and eastward to Ruacana (see Conradie et al. 2012), 20­–25 January 2009.

 

Pedioplanis husabensis Berger-Dell’mour & Mayer, 1989

Herpetozoa, 1(3/4):89; Figs. 6–7.

Paratypes: PEM R16099 (formerly SMWN 5311); northern side of Husab Mountain (22°40’S 15°8’E; 750 m a.s.l.), Namib Park, Swakopmund District, Namibia; H. Berger-Dell’mour, 11 January 1985.

Remarks: Donated to PEM in 1992 by H. Berger-Dell’mour from SMWN.

 

Scaptira knoxii pequensis Hewitt, 1935

Records of the Albany Museum, 4:324.

Current name: Meroles knoxii (Milne-Edwards, 1829)

Syntypes (3): PEM R16102–4 (formerly AMG 5454); Luderitz-bucht [=Lüderitz], Namibia; Miss E. Saunders, ‘16 November 1926’.

Remarks. The type description refers to three specimens in the type series and makes no reference to, or illustrates, a specific specimen. All specimens have ventral incisions and PEM R16012 with a missing tail.

 

Tropidosaura essexi Hewitt, 1927

Records of the Albany Museum, 3(5):378; Plate XXII, Fig. 2.

Syntypes (5): PEM R16094–8 (formerly AMG 5227); Summit of Mont-aux-Sources, Lesotho; Mr. R. Essex, 12 January 1926.

Remarks. Type description refers to a series of seven specimens, but only five are present in the type bottle transferred from AMG to PEM. No holotype was designated in the original description, but two specimens are illustrated in the plates. We can confidently assign PEM R16097 to the specimen on the left and PEM R16094 to the specimen on the right of Plate XXII, Fig. 2. PEM R16097 is an adult with a complete but regenerated tail; PEM R16069 has a damaged head; other specimens in good condition.

 

SCINCIDAE

Acontias albigularis Conradie, Busschau & Edwards, 2018 

Zootaxa, 4429(1):95; Figs. 5–7.

Holotype: PEM R20655; Mauchsberg, Long Tom Pass (-25.14113 S, 30.60522 E; 2530BA; 2149 m a.s.l.), Mpumalanga, South Africa; W. Conradie, T. Busschau and A. Jordaan, 9 December 2013.

Paratypes (12): a) PEM R20650–2, 20661, Top of Long Tom Pass (-25.149109 S, 30.61938 E; 2530BA; 2206 m a.s.l.), Mpumalanga, South Africa; W. Conradie, T. Busschau and A. Jordaan, 9 December 2013. b) PEM R20653–4, 20656–60, 20662, Mauchsberg, Long Tom Pass (-25.14113 S, 30.60522 E; 2530BA; 2149 m a.s.l.), Mpumalanga, South Africa; W. Conradie, T. Busschau and A. Jordaan, 9 December 2013.

Remarks. All type specimens with mid-ventral incisions, in good condition otherwise. Mostly adults, but PEM R20651–3 are juveniles.

 

Acontias breviceps Essex, 1925          

Records of the Albany Museum, 3:332. Fig. p. 335 (left).

Lectotype: PEM R5570 (AMG un-numbered); Hogsback, Amatola Mountains, Eastern Cape, South Africa; R. Essex, September 1924.

Paralectotypes (2): PEM R5101 & 5102; same collection details as lectotype.

Remarks. Both the lectotype and one of the parolectotypes (PEM R5101) have the pectoral region dissected to enable Essex to study the pectoral girdle (see drawing in Essex 1925:333). Parolectotype PEM R5101 has a damaged (crushed) head. Paralectotype PEM R5102 is a dehydrated juvenile with mid-ventral cut extending onto the right side of the belly. After examining the AMG material, D.G. Broadley (16 March 1968) added a label to PEM R5570 noting that it is the lectotype. However, this was not formally stated in the resulting manuscript (Broadley & Greer 1969), which refers only to “3 cotypes”. As PEM R5570 is the specimen illustrated in the type description (Fig. left, p. 335)–and is in good condition–Conradie et al. (2018) designate it as lectotype.

 

Acontias gracilicauda Essex, 1925     

Records of the Albany Museum, 3:334 Fig. p. 335 (right)

Holotype: PEM R5131 (AMG un-numbered); Grahamstown, Eastern Cape, South Africa; E. Railey, date unknown.

Remarks. The type description provides measurements for the ‘Type’. PEM R5131 is labeled (in D.G. Broadley’s handwriting) as the holotype and fits the dimensions provided in the type description (Fig. right, p. 335). Conradie et al. (2018) in error referred to this specimen as the lectotype. The specimens from Carolina (PEM R5140) and Alicedale (PEM R5142–4) are discussed in the description and were present in the type bottle, but have no nomenclatural standing. The type is in good condition, except for part of the ventral skin removed. Essex (1925, 1927) dissected one A. gracilicauda to study the pectoral girdle, but this could not have been the holotype as there is no anterior incision in PEM R5131. An unlabeled and unaccessioned specimen in the original type bottle received from AMG has the ventral skin removed and an anterior incision to expose the pectoral region. This is probably the specimen on which Essex based his description of the pectoral region. It is without provenance and has no nomenclatural standing.

             

Acontias lineatus orangensis Hewitt, 1938  

Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa, 26:47.

Current name: Acontias lineatus Peters, 1879

Lectotype: PEM R4440 (formerly AMG 2210); Kakamas, Northern Cape, South Africa; Miss H.C. Oliver, date unknown.

Parolectotype: PEM R4441 (formerly AMG 2210); same details as lectotype.

Remarks. Broadley & Greer (1969) confusingly noted (p. 24): “AM 2210 (2, one lectotype here nominated)”, but failed to give further details to distinguish which of the two specimens was nominated. Fortunately one specimen (now PEM R4441) has a label in D.G. Broadley’s handwriting (16 March 1968) noting it as the lectotype. Broadley & Greer (1969) considered it a junior synonym of Acontias lineatus lineatus Peters 1879 (which is now a binomial, following the elevation of the subspecies A. l. grayi Boulenger 1887 and A. l. tristis Werner 1911 to specific status by Lamb et al., 2010). An additional non-type specimen from Hopetown (PEM R4442, formerly AM 2175) is mentioned in the description. All specimens are in perfect condition, except that the tail of the Hopetown specimen is partly severed.

 

Acontias meleagris lineicauda Hewitt, 1937b                          

A Guide to the Vertebrate Fauna of the Eastern Cape, South Africa. Part II Reptiles, Amphibians and Freshwater Fishes. Grahamstown, p. 41.

Current name: Acontias lineicauda Hewitt, 1937

Lectotype: PEM R5128 (formerly AMG 7053); Dunbrody, Uitenhage district, Eastern Cape, South Africa; Rev. K. Tasman, date unknown.

Paralectotypes (8): a) PEM R5123–5127, 5129 (AMG 7053); same collection details as lectotype. b) PEM R5121 (formerly AMG 718B); Dunbrody, Uitenhage district, Eastern Cape, South Africa; Rev. K. Tasman, 23 December 1908. c) PEM R5122 (formerly AMG 5193); Dunbrody, Uitenhage district, Eastern Cape, South Africa; Rev. K. Tasman, 5 December 1925.

Remarks. Although Hewitt (1938) provided formal descriptions of both A. m. lineicauda and A. m. orientalis, he had used both names, with illustrations, descriptions and localities, in an early popular publication (Hewitt 1937b) and these therefore constitute the original type descriptions of both taxa. The subsequent allocation of the names to Hewitt (1938) by (e.g.) FitzSimons (1943) and Welch (1982) is incorrect. However, due to its popular nature the original description (Hewitt 1937b) does not designate a type or type series for either name. The subsequent descriptions (Hewitt 1938) do, however, give insight into the material on which Hewitt must have based his decisions. He lists (p. 39) only “A series of specimens from Dunbrody, Uitenhage district, C.P.” collected by Rev. K. Tasman.

The type bottle received from the AMG contained 10 specimens collected at Dunbrody. Eight of them (all labeled AMG 7053) have only ‘Dunbrody’ written on the original label, one (AMG 5193) has ‘Dunbrody’, the collector ‘Rev. K. Tasman’ and date ‘5 December 1925’ written on it, one (AMG 718B) with another re-written label with Dunbrody and the date ‘23/xii/08’, and one (AMG 7087) has only ‘Dunbrody’ on the label. The type bottle also contained specimens from: Farm Middleton, Lower Governors Kop near Grahamstown, and Redhouse. The above material is listed in the type description, but the material from Uniondale and Port Elizabeth listed in the type description is unaccounted for in the PEM collection. In their discussion of the taxon, Broadley & Greer (1969: 23) noted four specimens from Dunbrody “AM. 718b, 5193, 7053 (seven, including lectotype of lineicauda, here nominated), and 7087’. This is confusing as AMG 7053 is represented by eight specimens (seven adults and one juvenile ~ see above). They further only indicated that one of the specimens in the series AMG 7053 is the lectotype. One of the specimens from the series AMG 7053 (PEM R5128) bears a label (“lectotype, 16 March 1968”) in D.G. Broadley’s handwriting and we follow this designation. It is very unusual that the Middleton specimen is illustrated in Plate III, Fig. 1, and not one of the numerous specimens from Dunbrody. All specimens, except for PEM R5123 and 5129, have a mid-ventral incision.

Broadley & Greer (1969) considered A. meleagris lineicauda Hewitt, 1937 to be a junior subjective synonym of A. m. orientalis Hewitt, 1937, but the taxon was subsequently elevated to species status (Lamb et al. 2010).

 

Acontias meleagris orientalis Hewitt, 1937b

A Guide to the Vertebrate Fauna of the Eastern Cape, South Africa. Part II Reptiles, Amphibians and Freshwater Fishes. Grahamstown, p. 41.

Current name: Acontias orientalis Hewitt, 1937.

Syntypes (3): a) PEM R5115 (formerly AMG 5030); Grahamstown, Eastern Cape, South Africa; J. Hewitt, 16 May 1925. b) PEM R5116 (formerly AMG 8066); Nature Reserve, Grahamstown, Eastern Cape, South Africa; collector and date unknown. c) PEM R5117; Grahamstown, Eastern Cape, South Africa; ‘C.D.B. Liebenberg’, date unknown.

Remarks. Broadley & Greer (1969) first noted that Hewitt’s Acontias melegaris orientalis was actually named in a popular publication (Hewitt 1937b, p. 41), a year earlier than the appearance of the ‘formal’ description (Hewitt 1938). It was subsequently elevated to specific status, with Acontias percivali tasmani Hewitt, 1938 as a junior subjective synonym, by Lamb et al. (2010). As with the previous taxon, the popular publication in which this species was described gives no indication of types, although it does state that it is based on material from Grahamstown. Later Hewitt (1938: 41) noted “Types. - A series of specimens from Grahamstown, now in the Albany Museum.” Donald Broadley informally designated two different specimens as lectotypes. He firstly designated PEM R5116 (AMG 8066) as lectotype on 16 March 1968, followed later by the designation of PEM R5115 (AMG 5030) as lectotype on 22 January 1969. No formal lectotype designation has been published and we refer to them all here as syntypes. The type description do illustrates PEM R5116 (Plate II, Figure 2) from “Nature Reserve, Grahamstown”..

 

Acontias plumbeus namaquensis Hewitt, 1938        

Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa, 26:47; Plate III, Fig. 3.

Current name: Acontias namaquensis Hewitt, 1938.

Holotype: PEM R4443 (formerly AMG 959); O’okiep, Namaqualand, Northern Cape, South Africa; Dr. R.W. Howard, 10 October (year unknown).       

Remarks. The description refers to the type as a ‘A single adult from O’okiep…’. The adult specimen from O’okiep is also illustrated in the plates. The description further refers to two smaller specimens from; Kamiesberg (PEM R4826) and Steinkopf (PEM R4827, formerly AMG 1413) collected by Capt. G.C. Shortridge as additional non-type material. All specimens are in perfect condition except for PEM R4826 which has a mid-ventral incision. This taxon was elevated to specific status by Lamb et al. (2010).

 

Acontias plumbeus occidentalis FitzSimons, 1941   

Annals of the Transvaal Museum, 20: 275.

Current name: Acontias occidentalis FitzSimons, 1941.

Lectotype: PEM R5105 (formerly AMG 6064); Okahandja, Namibia; K. Bradfield, 23 April 1929.

Paralectotypes (2): PEM R5113–5114 (formerly AMG 5978); Honingfontein, near Nylstroom, Limpopo, South Africa; J. MacCallum, 18 December 1928.

Remarks. Merterns (1955) was the first to designate AMG 6064 (now PEM R5105) as the lectotype and this was followed by Broadley & Greer (1969). All specimens have a longitudinal incision on the belly. The lectotype has a cross-incision in the anterior part of the body. The type description mentions that the other paralectotypes are in TMP and SAM.

 

Acontias plumbeus tasmani Hewitt, 1938    

Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa, 26:44; Plate III; Figs 6–7.

Current name: Acontias orientalis Hewitt, 1938.

Lectotype: PEM R5152 (formerly AMG 5193); Dunbrody, Sundays River, Eastern Cape, South Africa; Rev. K. Tasman, 5 December 1925.

Paralectotypes (4): PEM R5154–6, 5165 (formerly AMG 5195); Dunbrody, Uitenhage district, Eastern Cape, South Africa; Rev. K. Tasman, 7 December 1925.

Remarks. The type description refers to ‘a series of specimens from Dunbrody, Sundays River…’ collected by Rev. K. Tasman. There are six AMG series of specimens from this type locality in the PEM, i.e. AMG 7053 (21 specimens - PEM R5153, 5157–5159, 5162–5164, 5168, 5170–5180 and 5192–3), AMG 5465 (PEM R5167), AMG 5166 (PEM R5166), AMG 5195 (four specimens - PEM R5154–5156, 5165), AMG 5193 (PEM R5152), and AMG 7087 (two specimens - PEM R5160, 5169). Only the series of specimens AMG 5195 and 5193 can be assigned to the Rev. K. Tasman collection. We thus restrict the type series to these two series of specimens and the remainder must be regarded as additional topotypic material. Donald Broadley designated PEM R5152 as lectotype (handwritten label dated 16 March 1968; Broadley & Greer, 1969) and we follow that assignment. The lectotype is in good condition with a ventral flap anterior to the cloaca. We can with confidence assign the specimen in Figure 6 to PEM R5166 (collected by J. Hewitt at Dunbrody) and the specimen in Figure 7 to PEM R5186 (collected in Port Elizabeth, 22 March 1936). In the type description Hewitt refers to other collections from Uitenhage (unaccounted for in PEM), Redhouse (PEM R5183, 5190, 5191), Port Elizabeth (PEM R5181, 5182, 5184, 5186–5189), Klienpoort near Grahamstown (PEM R5770) and Resolution (PEM R5157, 5148, 5149–5151) which represent additional non-type material. Hewitt illustrated two specimens in Plate III.

 

Acontias wakkerstroomensis Conradie, Busschau & Edwards, 2018             

Zootaxa, 4429(1):99; Figs. 5–7.

Holotype: PEM R22788; north of Wakkerstroom on Amersfoort road, (-27.28250 S, 30.11750 E; 2730AC, 1847 m a.s.l.), Mpumalanga, South Africa; W. Conradie, C. Conradie and M. Morrison, 23 December 2015.

Remarks. Holotype with mid-ventral incisions, in good condition.

 

Scelotes natalensis Hewitt, 1921

Annals of the Durban Museum, 3:3–6; Fig. 1.

Current name: Scelotes inornatus (Smith, 1849).

Syntype: PEM R5130(formerly DMP 0101); Durban, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa; Mrs. S. Collins, 16 June 1918.

Remarks. Type description refers to two specimens in the DMP. One must have been donated to Albany Museum (now PEM R5130), and this syntype is in good condition.

 

Scolecoseps broadleyi Verburgt, Verburgt & Branch, 2018

African Journal of Herpetology, 67(1):5; Figs. 2–3

Paratypes (4): a) PEM R22697; from near Maganja (10°50’08.2”S, 40°33’25.4”E), Palma District, Cabo Delgado Province, Mozambique; L. Verburgt, 24 August 2013. b) PEM R22698; near Quionga, 20 km north of Palma (10°35’55.4”S, 40°29’40.8”E), Palma District, Cabo Delgado Province, Mozambique; L. Verburgt, 4 December 2013. c) PEM R22699; 15 km inland from Olumbe, 20 km S of Palma (10°59’23.8”S, 40°25’13.8”E), Palma District, Cabo Delgado Province, Mozambique; L. Verburgt, 21 February 2014. d) PEM R22696; 10 km inland from Olumbe, 20 km south of Palma (11°00’15.6”S, 40°21’47.5”E), Palma District, Cabo Delgado Province, Mozambique; L. Verburgt, 22 February 2014.

Remarks. All paratypes are in good condition. The holotype is in NMZB according to the description.

 

Typhlosaurus aurantiacus parietalis Broadley, 1990

Arnoldia Zimbabwe, 9:469.

Current name: Acontias parietalis (Broadley, 1990)

Paratypes (3): a) PEM R9418–9419 (formerly AMG1597); Mseleni, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa; collector and date unknown. b) PEM R9420 (formerly AMG 7607); Manaba, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa; collector and date unknown.

Remarks: The original labels on PEM R9418–19 read ‘no. 1597 Durban Museum, Pietermaritzburg’. The type description refers to both AMG 1597 and additional material NMP (112 and 128) from the same locality as the paratypes. We therefore believe that the PEM specimens were donated to the AMG by NMP, but no documentation to this effect exists. Bleached but otherwise in good condition. Elevated to full species by Pietersen et al. (2018).

 

SERPENTES

ATRACTASPIDIDAE

Atractaspis duerdeni Gough, 1907                  

Records of the Albany Museum, 2:178.

Holotype: PEM R7938; Serowe, Botswana; S. Blackbeard, 3 May 1904.

Remarks. The type specimen is bleached and without any signs of pattern. There is a mid-ventral incision, and an old scar dorsally behind the head.

 

COLUBRIDAE

Philothamnus natalensis occidentalis Broadley, 1966          

Annals of the Natal Museum, 18(2):417.

Current name: Philothamnus occidentalis Broadley, 1966.

Paratypes (3): a) PEM R1172 & 1773; Alice, Eastern Cape, South Africa; A.N. Loest, 1 September 1945 and 1 December 1944 respectively. b) PEM R1774; Baakens River, Eastern Cape, South Africa; J. Pringle, 5 May 1938.

Remarks: Elevated to full species by Engelbrecht et al. (2018).

 

LAMPROPHIIDAE

Lamprophis swazicus Schaefer, 1970

Annals of Cape Province Museums (Natural History), 8(14):205.

Current name: Inyoka swazicus (Schaefer, 1970).

Holotype: PEM R13502 (formerly PEM R1514/81); Forbes Reef (26°09’S, 31°05’E), Swaziland; J. Culverwell, October 1968.

Paratype: PEM R13503 (formerly PEM R1514/82); same collection details as holotype.

Remarks. Holotype in perfect condition with four ventral longitudinal incisions. Paratype with continuous ventral incision from behind head to cloaca, in poor condition.

 

Psammophis zambiensis Hughes & Wade, 2002                     

Bulletin of the Natural History Museum London (Zoology), 68(2):75; Figs. 1–3.

Paratypes: PEM R967 (formerly PEM 1438/12); Mporokoso, northern Zambia; collector unknown, June 1943.

Remarks: Damaged posterior ventral scales, otherwise in fair condition.

 

VIPERIDAE

Atheris mabuensis Branch & Bayliss, 2009   

Zootaxa, 2113:44; Figs. 2–7.

Holotype: PEM R17901; main forest camp, Mount Mabu (16°17’12”S, 36°24’14”E; 1000 m a.s.l.), Mozambique; local hunter, 20 October 2008.

Paratypes (3): a) PEM R17902; same locality as holotype; T. Timberlake, 20 October 2008. b) PEM R17903; same locality as holotype; J. Bayliss, 20 October 2008. c) PEM R17904; Khara Forest (lower end on Manho Forest) (15°24’39.9”S, 37°02’16.5”E; 1550 m a.s.l.), Mount Namuli, Zambezia Province, Mozambique; C. Congdon, 20 November 2008.

Remarks. All specimens with a mid-ventral incision. One paratype (PEM R1902) is badly preserved with four ventral incisions. Menegon et al. (2014) provided genetic sequences for this species (see Table 2).

 

Bitis atropos unicolor FitzSimons, 1959                       

Annals of the Transvaal Museum, 23:409.

Holotype: PEM R8220 (formerly AMG 1251); Witpoort, about 20 miles north of Belfast, Mpumalanga, South Africa; Mr. R. Gerhart, date unknown.

Paratypes (3): a) PEM R8219 (formerly AMG 1421) and PEM R8221 (formerly AMG 1402); both with same collection details as holotype. b) PEM R8218 (formerly AMG 1735); Witbooi, Mpumalanga, South Africa; Mr. R. Gerhart, date unknown.

Remarks. The labels on the holotype and one paratype read: “Doornkop near Belfast”, but the locality is listed as “Witpoort, about 20 miles north of Belfast” in the description. In the description, FitzSimons (1959: 409) only lists the holotype (AMG 1251) and two paratypes (AMG 1402 & TMP 5906), under the heading “Types” and refers to the other two (AMG 1421 & 1735) as additional material. Later he refers to all the material as paratypes under the measurements table (FitzSimons 1959: 409). We thus regard all the material as being types. Under ‘Types’ he refers to one paratype as ‘TM 5906’, but then as ‘AM 5906’ under measurements. This is in error as the original TMP specimen labels reads ‘TM 5906 previously AMG 1049’ and was donated to TMP by AM. AM 1421 is unaccounted for in the PEM. All specimens are in good condition.

 

Bitis cornuta albanica Hewitt, 1937b                                          

Guide to the Vertebrate Fauna of the Eastern Cape, South Africa. Part II Reptiles, Amphibians and Freshwater Fishes; p. 76; Plate 21.

Current name: Bitis albanica Hewitt, 1937.

Lectotype: PEM R8279 (formerly AMG 6860); Klienpoort, near Comittees, Eastern Cape, South Africa; W. Pannell, date unknown.

Paralectoypes (4): a) PEM R8278 (formerly AMG 7135); same details as lectotype. b) PEM R8281 (formerly AMG 664); Brakkloof, Eastern Cape, South Africa; G. White, 1 October 1892. c) PEM R8280 (formerly AMG 453); no locality (Springvale or Brakkloos), Eastern Cape, South Africa. d) PEM R1183; The Dene (“Die Duine”), Port Elizabeth, Eastern Cape, South Africa.

Remarks. Bitis cornuta albanica was informally described in “Guide to the Vertebrate Fauna of the Eastern Cape, South Africa. Part II Reptiles, Amphibians and Freshwater Fishes” (Hewitt 1937b). This was a popular work and it is evident that Hewitt had a detailed manuscript prepared, describing this subspecies and several others, that he planned to publish elsewhere. However, a disastrous fire at the Albany Museum in 1941 stalled this, and afterwards Hewitt never published anything else relating to herpetology. Branch (1999) designated PEM R8279 as lectotype. The same specimen is illustrated in Plate XXI (Hewitt 1937b) and Figure 6 (Branch 1999). Lectotype intact, but paralectotypes have ventral incisions.

 

Bitis rubida Branch, 1997                     

South African Journal of Zoology, 32(2):38; Fig. 1.

Holotype: PEM R12582; Jeep track above Farm Driehoek (32°25’44”S, 19°12’30”E; 3219AC; 1380 m a.s.l.), Cedarberg [=Cederberg] Mountains, Western Cape, South Africa; S.A. Botha, 3 September 1986.

Paratype (5): a) PEM R4457; Crystal Pool (32°20’55”S, 19°08’10”E; 3219AC; 1340 m a.s.l.), Cederberg Mountains, Western Cape Province, South Africa; S.A. Botha, April 1985. b) PEM R12583; Welbedacht (32°25’45”S, 19°11’00”E; 3219AC), Cederberg Mountains, Western Cape Province, South Africa; J. van Deventer, October 1988. c) PEM R12581, on footpath from hut to Crystal Pool (32°20’55”S, 19°06’49”E; 3219AC; 1320 m a.s.l.), Cederberg Mountains, Western Cape Province, South Africa; S. A. Botha, 2 September 1986. d) PEM R5048 (formerly CDNEC 10193); Cederberg (village) (approx. 32°32’S, 19°16’E; 3219CB), 30 km from Algeria forestery station Western Cape Province, South Africa; M. Burger, 17 May 1990. e) PEM R8861; 3 km N of Veepos (32°58’10’S, 19°3’4”E; 3219CC), Groot Winterhoek Wilderness Area, Western Cape Province, South Africa; J. van Deventer, 2 March 1994.

Remarks. All the type material is in good condition, except PEM R5048 (road kill). One paratype is listed as being in SAM (SAM 46282).

 

Vipera armata Smith, 1826                 

Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, 1:251.

Current name: Bitis armata (Smith, 1826).

Neotype: PEM R6769; Koppe Alleen Road, De Hoop Nature Reserve, Western Cape, South Africa; M. Scott, 26 February 1991.

Remarks. Smith (1826) did not designate a type, and gave no details about the distribution of this species. To stabilise nomenclature Branch (1999), designated PEM R6769 as neotype.

 

Missing types

Tropidosaura montana rangeri Hewitt, 1926c

Annals of the South African Museum, 20:485. Plate XLIV, Fig. 3.

The PEM is in possession of three series of uncatalogued material: AMG 5445 (seven specimens) collected by G.A. Ranger at Kei Road on 13 October 1926, AMG 5375 collected by G.A. Ranger from Gleniffer Kei Road on 23 June 1926, and AMG 5384 collected by G.A. Ranger from Gleniffer Kei Road on 8 July 1925. The description refers to a specimen collected by G.A. Ranger in November 1925, and states that it was the only specimen in the AMG at that time. The only specimen that would have been available to Hewitt was AMG 5384. We compared the dorsal head scales to those illustrated in the description and they do not match. The type is thus currently unaccounted for, but may be included in the existing series if the type drawing was in error. Presently we regard this series of specimens in the PEM as topotypes, collected shortly after the types’ stated collecting date. This forms a suitable source for a neotype should this be considered desirable.

 

Unconfirmed types status

Oedura halli Hewitt, 1935

Records of the Albany Museum, 4:321; Plate XXIX, Figs1–2.

Current name: Afroedura halli (Hewitt, 1935)

Topotypes (2): PEM R8481 and 8502 (formerly AMG 6880); Telle Junction near Palmietfontein, Herschel district, Eastern Cape, South Africa; Mr. Chas Hall.

Remarks. The type description refers to two adult male specimens in the NMP. Although one of the syntypes was exchanged to the TMP (no. 19183) according to Mashinini & Mahlangu (2013). In the description it is mentioned that Mr. Hall presented an additional nine specimens to Hewitt (p. 323). The PEM have two of these specimens with exactly the same collection details as the syntypes. The PEM male specimens (PEM R8502) fit the illustrated specimens in the type description. It is best to regard the PEM material as topotypes. Additional non-type PEM specimens referred to in the type description: Majuba Nek (PEM R8454, R8573), Cala (PEM R8898) and Masito (PEM R11918).

 

Agama lionotus var. dodomae Loveridge, 1923

Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London, 1923:943.

Current name: Agama lionotus dodomae Loveridge, 1923

Paratype: PEM R5745 (formerly MCZ R18570); Mtali, Tanzania; A. Loveridge, 5 November 1921.

Remarks. On page 944 Loveridge states ‘I now designate as types a male from Gwao’s, 10.x.21, and a female from Gwao’s, 3.x.22, which have been donated to the British Museum’. The description indicates that a total of 35 specimens from a few localities were collected and included in the description, but no mention is made to the type status of the remaining material. The online MCZ database indicates that T. Barbour donated a series of specimens labelled as paratypes to the MCZ. One of these was donated by Loveridge to Hewitt at the AMG. It is clear from the description that the material in MCZ should best be considered as non-type material.